Area Man Has Watched all of Rick and Morty, Is Smarter than You

by RICKY SPAULDING AND ELIZABETH BERNBAUM
Published: March 11, 2018
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Courtesy of Elizabeth Bernbaum

“It’s actually so well done,” says Peter Davis, a University of Washington Junior who is confident that you will be skeptical because of the show’s animated format and goofy humor. “Like, obviously it’s really out there, but the writing is amazing. It gets so dark.” Davis goes on to explain that Rick is a complex anti-hero whose character is both abhorrent and sympathetic, using the words, “compelling,” “nuanced,” and “actually” several times for emphasis. “It’s cool because it’s like very meta,” he claims, before detailing the show’s profound self-awareness with passionate verbal synopses of several episodes. Still talking at press time, Davis insists that “it’s one of those shows that really demands a lot of perceptive thought. Like, on the surface, it’s really goofy, but it gets away with it because on a deeper level, it delves into some really heavy, philosophical concepts.” Pressed on the philosophy of the show, Davis explains, “It’s amazing. They talk about like mortality and the meaning of life… but in like a very nuanced and meaningful way. It’s all about nihilism, and godlessness, and do you know Camus? You should look up Camus. Dan Harmon is definitely an absurdist. And, I can’t believe McDonalds is actually bringing back Szechuan Sauce. I’m really excited to try it, but also, of course they would try to capitalize off of messaging that like doesn’t at all support their system of production. You know? You kind of just have to watch the show to get it.”

Some of Davis’s other interests include the Netflix original BoJack Horseman, which he calls “a largely undiscovered gem which masterfully exposes like all this normalized misery and purposelessness in life and really does a good job of portraying humans’ deeply destructive nature. It’s just so honest.” Davis also enjoys telling women who did not ask, that the third Harry Potter film was directed by Alfonso Cuarón, and talking about the books he’s “totally been meaning to read. I’ve heard it’s just fantastically intellectually investigative,” said Davis about the last book he described. “There’s so much layering and so much to unpack, and just not enough people are talking about it. It deserves more attention.”